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How can the big boss not know? - 04/03/14

  I've watched some of the hearings with GM CEO Marry Barra on Capitol Hill. I don't want to make this political -- I don't care which side of the aisle you're on. But doesn't it seem a little strange that the big boss -- I mean, the boss who runs the biggest car company in America -- doesn't know what happened with the ignition switch problem?
  It seems a little too convenient that she doesn't know much about what happened when the ignition switch was identified as faulty, after dozens of  crashes and at least 13 deaths. I'm not saying that she was involved in it, or played any role in a process that delayed an auto recall for ten years. Again, this isn't political, it's common sense. She took office as CEO in January after 33 years at the company. Didn't she have the power at that point to call some people on the carpet to find out what went wrong? Surely she knew enough about the company, after 33 years, to ask the right questions. Can you imagine Jeff Bezos having virtually no clue what wrong after two months of investigating it? Or Jack Welch? Or Sheryl Sandberg or Meg Whitman for that matter?
  And who did the bail out deal with GM that allowed them to avoid financial exposure in anything that they may have done wrong?
  My wife asked me yesterday. Don't people have a conscience anymore?


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