Hey, we won! Let's destroy something! - 04/08/14

I'll preface this blog by warning it's a bit of a rant but I know there are a lot of you who agree with me.

I don't get it.
Really.
I just don't get it.
WHY do people destroy things when they're happy?
Do sports fans sit around and think "hey, my team just won, I'm going to set a couch on fire!"

Granted, there may be alcohol involved in these decisions, but trashing something when you're thrilled doesn't make sense.  I'd like to pick the brain of a psychologist to get some answers.

I don't have one at my disposal, so I Googled "why do people destroy things when they're happy?" and these headlines popped up:

  1. How Not to Destroy Your Marriage: 8 Tips for Staying a Happy Couple

  2. 6 Things Happy People Never Do - Marc and Angel Hack Life

  3. 8 Bad Reasons to Break Up - eHarmony Advice

  4. 5 clues you're stuck in a dysfunctional relationship

  5. Top 10 Things Women Do To Destroy Their Marriage


So I Googled "why do sports fans burn couches?" and got these headlines:

Photos: Kentucky Fans Are Rioting, Starting Fires After Win Over ...

Kentucky wins basketball game over rival, fans burn couches in ...

WVU takes credit for couch-burning craze that has caught fire at UK ...



IMHO, it's dumb.   It wastes resources and money and it's dangerous.  Setting fires, fighting, flipping cars: these are the kinds of things that happen in war zones or during riots of protest against governments.  These shouldn't be the kinds of things that sports fans do to celebrate victory. 

What if 8 year old little league players won their regional and celebrated by torching the concession stand?  What if little gymnasts celebrated winning a state meet by taking chainsaws to their playgrounds?  Make sense?  Nope.  But that's the kind of example being set by a bunch of morons who apparently don't know any better.

 

Get This

Last Update on March 26, 2015 09:32 GMT

IN THE NEWS: GPS CAUSES MLB PITCHER TO GET LOST

UNDATED (AP) -- You've heard of baseball pitchers who have trouble finding the plate. How about a pitcher who can't even find the ballpark in which the plate is located. That was the deal with Edwin Jackson of the Chicago Cubs. He missed his first spring training start Tuesday -- when he ended up at the wrong stadium. Jackson says he typed "Oakland Athletics spring training complex" into his smartphone -- and off he went. Off, as in off in the wrong direction. The GPS on his phone sent him to Phoenix Municipal Stadium. But Oakland no longer plays there; they're five miles away. He finally found the ballpark. And the way he pitched, next time his opponents might send a car for him. He gave up eight runs and nine hits in just 1 and 2-3 innings.

NCAA BLACKOUT

LINCOLN, Neb. (AP) -- Talk about your bracket busters. Officials in Nebraska are telling lawmakers if they want to watch the NCAA basketball tournament -- they'll have to do it after work. Legislative and judicial administrators have been informed through email that Web sites for streaming the NCAA tournament are blocked on the Capitol's network. Officials say when too many people stream the games, the Internet bogs down for official state business. Already the state blocks sites that feature gambling, pornography -- and sites that are notorious for malware.

NEW YORK JETS HELP WITH PROM PROPOSAL

NEW YORK (AP) -- It may not be enough to wipe out the memory of the notorious "butt fumble." But some members of the New York Jets were able to help a young woman complete a "pass" -- by asking a guy out to the prom. Sarah Kardonski was able to get several members of the team to appear in a video in which she asks Michael Pagano to go to the high school prom with her. At one point, one Jets player leans into the camera and whispers: "Say yes." Pagano did.

CYCLISTS IN DRIVE-THRU LANES?

SALT LAKE CITY (AP) -- Hold the mayo -- and the two-wheelers? The governor of Utah has approved a measure that will, in effect, ban bicycles from using drive-thru lanes at restaurants. Gary Herbert has approved a bill to override a mandate in Salt Lake City that lets bikers queue-up along with cars, trucks and other vehicles at drive-thru windows. The Salt Lake City rule says restaurants must serve those on two wheels if they close their lobby -- but continue to offer drive-thru service. Salt Lake City officials say the law would make the city less car-dependent. But opponents say having cyclists mingle with vehicles in a drive-thru lane is dangerous.

 
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