Hey, we won! Let's destroy something! - 04/08/14

I'll preface this blog by warning it's a bit of a rant but I know there are a lot of you who agree with me.

I don't get it.
Really.
I just don't get it.
WHY do people destroy things when they're happy?
Do sports fans sit around and think "hey, my team just won, I'm going to set a couch on fire!"

Granted, there may be alcohol involved in these decisions, but trashing something when you're thrilled doesn't make sense.  I'd like to pick the brain of a psychologist to get some answers.

I don't have one at my disposal, so I Googled "why do people destroy things when they're happy?" and these headlines popped up:

  1. How Not to Destroy Your Marriage: 8 Tips for Staying a Happy Couple

  2. 6 Things Happy People Never Do - Marc and Angel Hack Life

  3. 8 Bad Reasons to Break Up - eHarmony Advice

  4. 5 clues you're stuck in a dysfunctional relationship

  5. Top 10 Things Women Do To Destroy Their Marriage


So I Googled "why do sports fans burn couches?" and got these headlines:

Photos: Kentucky Fans Are Rioting, Starting Fires After Win Over ...

Kentucky wins basketball game over rival, fans burn couches in ...

WVU takes credit for couch-burning craze that has caught fire at UK ...



IMHO, it's dumb.   It wastes resources and money and it's dangerous.  Setting fires, fighting, flipping cars: these are the kinds of things that happen in war zones or during riots of protest against governments.  These shouldn't be the kinds of things that sports fans do to celebrate victory. 

What if 8 year old little league players won their regional and celebrated by torching the concession stand?  What if little gymnasts celebrated winning a state meet by taking chainsaws to their playgrounds?  Make sense?  Nope.  But that's the kind of example being set by a bunch of morons who apparently don't know any better.

 

Get This

Last Update on August 31, 2015 09:29 GMT

SELFIE CRASH

ORIENT, Maine (AP) -- Texting and driving? Not safe. Driving while taking a selfie? Even more not safe. Police in Maine say a man crashed his car while taking a selfie with his passengers. Authorities say several people were hurt when 29-year-old Jordan Toner lost control of the vehicle he was driving with seven passengers. When he leaned over to take the selfie, his car ran off the road and hit a tree. He's been hit with a distracted driving summons.

DESTINY'S CHALLENGE

BOISE, Idaho (AP) -- Sheriff's deputies in Idaho are trying to find their destiny. That's Destiny as in the girl's name -- not their reason for being. Authorities have been interviewing more than a dozen girls named Destiny as they try to crack a vandalism case. It seems someone spray-painted a prom invitation on part of the Black Cliffs in southwest Idaho back in May. The message read: "Destiny, Prom?" If authorities can track down who was trying to woo Destiny, that person's destiny could be jail. The crime is punishable by up to six months behind bars and a fine of $1,000.

GRENADE BROUGHT TO POLICE STATION

SOUTH BURLINGTON, Vt. (AP) -- A grenade in hand -- was worth a lot of concern to police in South Burlington, Vermont. A woman found a hand grenade in her grandfather's belongings -- and decided to bring it to the police station. That got their attention. Police cleared the department and nearby buildings -- because they weren't sure if the grenade was live. In the end, the state bomb squad had to come in to deal with the grenade. As late as yesterday, authorities hadn't determined whether the grenade was dangerous or inactive. They are urging residents who find grenades or other potentially devices to leave them where they are -- and call the police.

TELESCOPE MISTAKEN FOR RIFLE

FARGO, N.D. (AP) -- They were hoping to check out some stars. But the first light they saw when trying to use their telescope -- was that from police officers who mistook their telescope for a rifle. Levi Joraanstad and Colin Waldera were setting up their telescope behind their apartment Monday when police flashed a bright light into their eyes and told them to freeze. The students couldn't see who was shining the light -- and thought it was a prank by other students. Despite the confusion, it turned out O.K. Police say the students were never in any danger -- and that police approached them because they'd rather be safe than sorry.

 
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