The kid who got a roller coaster - 05/07/14

Let me start by saying:  This dad took "quality time" with his son to a whole new level and I appreciate that he created a learning experience.

But seriously, who builds a fully functioning large-scale roller coaster in their back yard?  I don't know this father-son team.  All I know is that the kid went to Six Flags, loved a roller coaster and so his dad built him one while teaching him about math at the same time.

Here's where I take issue.  First, when a reporter asked the kid where the roller coaster fell on a scale of 1 to 10, the kid said "9.5" because it didn't have a loop or wasn't taller or faster.  Excuse me?  Kid, your dad just BUILT YOU A ROLLER COASTER and you have the nerve to say it's not fast enough, tall enough and lacking a loop? 

(I'm about to "go there" so hang on)

THIS is what's wrong with so many kids right now.  There are children whose parents scrape by to put food on the table; parents who work 2, 3, 4 jobs to put them through college; parents who are working so hard to raise grateful, thankful, respectful children.

And I'd be remiss if I didn't address the other big issue here: the house with the roller coaster where everyone wants to play; the house with the roller coaster that will inevitably break and toss a kid; the home-made roller coaster that Heaven forbid may seriously injure or kill someone?  You know it will happen.  Lawsuit.  There will be a parent who sends their kid to ride the roller coaster who then promptly sues when their child gets hurt.  I hope that guy has a serious insurance policy or the sense to not let anyone else ride on it.  I also hope that kid finds some manners.  I'd like to quote Stephanie Tanner from "Full House" by saying, how rude!


 

 

Get This

Last Update on December 18, 2014 08:09 GMT

FAT BIKES

SHERIDAN, Wyo. (AP) -- Cold and snowy? To some it's perfect bike weather. A new style of bike is gaining traction for winter use -- it's the so-called fat bike first developed in Alaska. The bike gets its name from the 4-inch wide tires that can get a grip in snow or sand. The tires are about twice as wide as those on a conventional mountain bike. Jeff Stine is the co-owner of Backcountry Bike and Mountain Works in Sheridan, Wyoming. He tells the Sheridan Press a fat bike buyer can get two sets of wheels, for summer or winter use. But a winter bike could give your wallet a chill. Prices start at about $1,500.

WREATH THIEF

WESTERLY, R.I. (AP) -- The wreath thief has been busted. Police in Westerly, Rhode Island, report Christa Bradley turned herself in after a home security video was posted on Facebook. Police Chief Ed St. Clair says the video shows a woman walking up to Mary Sullivan's front door and walking off with her homemade wreath. The Westerly Sun reports Bradley is now charged with larceny under $1,500 and is due in court in about a month.

PISTOL PACKING HANDBAGS

TACOMA, Wash. (AP) -- Paula Summers has the purse -- for ladies who are packing. She's a Washington state private eye and found it difficult to carry a gun. Summers did some research and found a number of purses designed to carry concealed pistols. But she felt there had to be a better way to market them. So, she's created gun-packers.com -- "for women who pack heat." Her handbags range from $45 to just under a-grand. But there's more to carrying a gun than the right handbag. Summers tells The News Tribune potential gun-owners need to be trained and licensed according to their local laws.

MOOSE FRIENDS

GWINN, Mich. (AP) -- Sunshine and Jumper have some human buddies. Sunshine and Jumper are male moose in Michigan's Upper Peninsula. Food is short, so some people pals have been putting out healthy snacks, like alfalfa, apples and carrots for the moose. The animals have become regulars at an area cabin. The cabin owner asked not to be named by the Grand Rapids Press, so no one will come around to bother the moose. Their human buddies say the moose now eat out of their hands.

 
Advertise with us!