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What constitutes news? - 07/25/14

We've been talking a lot about this lately.  In fact, if you watch or listen to our live stream, you probably heard us talking about it during break the other day.

There's no doubt that journalism has changed since we started in this business.  More frequently, in the age of social media, exactly what constitutes news is changing.  I don't think it's for the better.

Are any of these stories newsworthy or of relevance to your life?

Boy banned from donut shop because owners think he's rude
Dad tweets about rude gate attendant
Girl sues her parents to pay for college tuition
Boy sent home for controversial t-shirt
Employee fired for spitting in customer's food

You know, these "problems" used to pop up and people would settle them on their own, NOT cry to the media about it.
It's frustrating to see that "news" has become a place for anyone to grip about something they don't like.   It's equally frustrating when news outlets fall for it.
If there's a story that helps solve a real problem; a story that holds the powerful accountable; a story that uncovers a true injustice; a story that investigates wrongdoing; those are some of the pillars of true journalism.
I'd like to say that we won't air these nonsense, non-news stories, but I know they will continue to show up.  As long as people use Google for reliable sources and can't live a day without a Facebook or Twitter check-in, I suppose those stories will be what end up in the headlines.


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Last Update on October 13, 2015 07:10 GMT


NEW YORK (AP) -- It looks good enough to eat. A new art exhibit in the Big Apple takes a bite out of food. "The Value of Food: Sustaining a Green Planet" has works from 30 artists. The exhibit is divided into seven themes: water, soil, seed, farm, market, meal and waste. Guest co-curator Robin Kahn says they hope visitors will "look at food in a new way that's more beneficial not only to them but to the Earth." The multimedia exhibition opened last week at the Cathedral of Saint John the Divine in Manhattan.


SEATTLE (AP) -- The law of supply and demand is going to be studied -- when it comes to pot. A new group at the University of Washington law school will look at markets for marijuana. The yearlong study will help inform the state as it prepares to combine the medical and recreational marijuana markets. The project will try to estimate the demand for legalized weed.


HELSINKI (AP) -- They were the good guys. Police in Sweden were called about a group of suspicious, bearded men with a black flag in the ruins of a castle. Authorities feared they could be Islamic State sympathizers. But these guys were a bunch of do-gooders. John Ekeblad is a co-founder of the Swedish chapter of the Bearded Villains. He says the so-called villains promote equality and do charity work. Ekeblad says the incident was "hilarious," and police drove off laughing.


DENVER (AP) -- It's the feds versus the makers of kombucha. That's a fermented tea that has moved from the natural foods aisle to the mainstream. Federal authorities say the brewers of the tea need to relabel their product to reflect it can contain alcohol. But the tea makers say it's a natural byproduct of the fermentation process. Makers of the tea are asking for new federal tests. They say the alcohol level is so low, many fruits have a similar content from natural fermentation.

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