Find Your Passion - 06/11/14

  The class of 2014 just graduated.  Many are headed to college to prepare for a career.  I remember being that age and trying to figure out what I wanted to do so I didn't waste my time or money in college training for a field I may never even work in.
  I was lucky in that I was already working in small market radio in high school and had discovered journalism and believed that would be a great way to combine two things I liked to do, broadcasting and writing.  That was my passion.  It was how I paid my way through college.  I still love what I do and feel blessed to work in broadcasting. 
  A few decades down the road, what I'm hoping for my own daughter who's headed to college is that she feels like she has the room to explore her interests.  She has a major and thinks she knows what she wants to do.  That's great, but I've already told her if you get in there and discover "I hate this," it's okay.  We'll regroup, set a new course and start moving in that direction.
  It's difficult to fathom what you're going to do for the rest of your life at the ripe old age of 18.  There's so many potential careers you've never even considered.  My advice, use your time in college to learn as much as you can about as many things as you can.  Find something that excites you, something you can't wait to learn more about.  Then figure out how you can make a living doing that.  Finding your passion will result in a satisfying career no matter what the financial rewards are.  There's an old saying, I believe is true, if you work at something you love, you never work a day in your life. 

 

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Last Update on October 24, 2014 09:09 GMT

COIN TOSS-MAYOR

LIMA, Peru (AP) -- Usually, one flips a coin to determine things like who gets the ball first in a football game or who gets first dibs at the last slice of pie or something. But to settle an election? That's what happened in a small town high in the Peruvian Andes. Two candidates tied at the ballot box -- with each getting 236 votes in the municipal election. Peru's electoral law allows tie races to be decided by a coin toss. So the coin was tossed. And the winner -- Wilber Medina. His rival says he's cool with the results. It isn't known whether heads or tails carried the day -- and the election.

PUMPKINS-PIGS

SOMERSWORTH, N.H. (AP) -- It started as a potential case of pilfered pumpkins. But it turned out to be a windfall for a group of pigs. Foster's Daily Democrat in Somersworth, New Hampshire reports hundreds of pumpkins were reported stolen earlier week. The gourds had been set aside behind a school to be sold this weekend at a craft fair. The investigation didn't get far. Turns out a farmer spotted the pumpkins and asked a school worker if he could take them to feed his pigs. The school employee didn't know the pumpkins were being saved -- and the farmer took them. Police say the only ones that turned out happy in the whole episode -- are the hogs.

FIREWORKS-FUNERAL

SPRINGFIELD, Mo. (AP) -- When the fireworks burst in the air tomorrow night over Springfield, Missouri -- it won't be the Fourth of July -- but the last of James Carver. A Missouri funeral director will be bidding farewell to his dad -- by having his cremated remains mixed with fireworks -- and launched into the sky. Carver's father is the first to try the program by Greenlawn Funeral Homes. His son Jim is the funeral director -- and says the eight-minute fireworks display will be followed by a cookout and memorial celebration.

 
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