Logging Back In - 10/14/13

   I'm back at work after a week off with my family.  We went to Florida to a community we like off 30-A South of Destin.  I don't have to tell most of you because you've been there because we saw you when we were there.  Whenever we go to the gulf coast we always see dozens of people from back home.  And that's just the ones who say hello at the beach or restaurants.

  I don't go out of town all that often but when I do, I don't post pictures on line or give updates on social media about where I am.  I save that for when I get back.  I suppose I've covered crime in middle Tennessee and Kentucky for too long to do anything that might help people who make a living stealing from the rest of us. 

  I always let my neighbors know when we're leaving and planning to return.  I usually ask one of them to grab my mail and newspapers and return the garbage can to the side of the house after pick up.  It sounds so simple but these are tell-tale signs nobody's home. 

  I'm not proposing to tell you what to do, just explaining why I do what I do regarding posting pics on social media sites when I'm out of town.  All of my friends will be just as happy to see my pics when I get back.  I see people post all the time when they're away and I think to myself, I hope only the right people see that post. 

  Let's be honest, once things are on line on Facebook or Instagram or Twitter, you don't really know who sees it or what their intentions are.  If you post pics of you at the beach, hundreds of miles from home just know it's information the wrong person could use to make your homecoming less than happy.

  Just a little food for thought because we all want to protect our homes.


 

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Last Update on November 25, 2014 10:09 GMT

MERRY MARIJUANA

DENVER (AP) -- Forget the mistletoe -- think marijuana instead. Colorado's legal pot sellers have holiday offerings for their customers. This will be the first holiday season since retail marijuana became legal in the state. The Grass Station in Denver has a Black Friday special -- an ounce of weed for just 50 bucks for the first 16 customers in line Friday, Saturday and Sunday. Other pot sellers are going for the high-end, high market. Colorado Harvest and Evergreen Apothecary are releasing some top-shelf strains for the season. Of course, you can't send pot through the mail. So, many of the stores offer T-shirts, rolling papers and other items Colorado's legal tokers can send out of state.

UGLY CHRISTMAS TREE

READING, Pa. (AP) -- It's like "A Charlie Brown Christmas" for some folks in Pennsylvania. The 50-foot Christmas tree in downtown Reading (REH'-ding) was criticized as being ugly. City Council president Francis Acosta had ordered that the spindly spruce be given the ax and replaced by a more impressive fir. But the tree that couldn't get any respect is now getting some love. Council President Acosta has ordered workers to stop removing the ornaments. The tree will now stay.

CHRISTMAS TREES-GROWERS

BARABOO, Wis. (AP) -- This Christmas looks a lot merrier for some Wisconsin tree growers. Christmas Treeland in Baraboo lost a few hundred trees due to dry weather this year. That compares to the 10,000 trees lost by growers Jim and Suzanne Dohner in each of the last two years. Christmas Valley Tree Farm owner Jack Meegan says this is a "very good" year. He tells the Baraboo News Republic he only lost a small percentage of his tree crop this year. He says his family-owned business sells 300 to 400 trees a year.

CALIFORNIA DROUGHT-DIRTY CARS

BURBANK, Calif. (AP) -- There's something dirty in Burbank city government. We're not talking corruption but cars. To help save water during California's historic drought, the city isn't washing its vehicles. The Los Angeles Times reports the unwashed rides number more than 300 including police cars and fire trucks. But the washing ban doesn't apply to windows, for safety reasons. "Go Dirty for the Drought" stickers are being put on the city's unwashed fleet.

 
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