Where Does It End? - 08/07/14

Increasing workloads and the ubiquitous presence of technology at work and home are combining to put more pressure on employees to remain always available, according to a recent survey from Randstad U.S. Many workers feel that they have to remain accountable when they're on vacation or sick at home. In fact, a notable share reported that they don't even use all of their available days off because they'd feel too guilty about shirking responsibilities if they did. Given this situation, managers should pay attention to research that indicates workers are less engaged on the job and morale is on the decline in the workplace. As a result, many workers expect to seriously consider offers from new employers in the near future. "Helping employees balance work and personal life remains a pain point for many U.S. companies," says Jim Link, chief human resources officer at Randstad North America. "With technology blurring workday boundaries, employees can easily slip into a pattern of being 'always available,' especially if their boss or co-workers engage in business after hours." More than 2,255 U.S. professionals took part in the research. - See more at: http://www.baselinemag.com/careers/slideshows/workplace-demands-increase-and-morale-sinks.html#sthash.siGuATYu.dpuf

  I don't think it matters what you do for a living, increasingly companies expect you to do more with less.  It's certainly true in the ever-changing broadcast news business.  There are more newscasts, more platforms to share information and the same or fewer people to deliver that product.  It's just the reality of the business.  Broadcasters aren't disappearing like our colleagues in the newspaper business but it's hard not to feel the pressure.

  I recently read a study conducted by Randstad, the temporary staffing company, found 65-percent of professionals feel pressure to answer emails from work during their off time.  I believe it but I don't subscribe to that school of thought. 

  My employer provides me a smart phone.  I'm grateful and it's a useful tool.  I do not, however, spend my off time tethered to the phone.  I keep it with me.  If I need to shoot a picture, record some video of something we might use on the air or need to learn about something on-line right now, I have it.  While I do my best to keep up with what's going on when I'm off work because I'm curious by nature, I'm not constantly checking my email.

  I think being a present spouse, parent, son, neighbor and friend are important.  If you want to talk to me right now, don't send me an email, pick up the phone and call me.  That's why they call it time off.  That's my opinion for what it's worth.  If you disagree, feel free to drop me an email.  I'll get to it when I'm on the clock.


 

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Last Update on October 02, 2014 09:08 GMT

MEAT THIEF

CROTON-ON-HUDSON, N.Y. (AP) -- Is that a roast beef in your pants? Or are you just happy to leave the store without paying? Police in New York State say a supermarket employee has been accused of leaving the store with $1,200 worth of meat hidden in his pants. State Police say Gregory Rodriguez, of Ossining is charged with fourth-degree grand larceny in the case. A spokeswoman for the state police says all the meat was swiped in just one day. But she says she doesn't know if it involved more than one trip to the store.

SINGING ROAD

TIJERAS, N.M. (AP) -- You've heard about cars that hum along on the road. How about a road that sings along with cars? There is one under construction in New Mexico -- where transportation officials are trying to curb speeding along historic Route 66. Tigress Productions is creating a "singing road" between Albuquerque and the mountain community of Tijeras. The road uses a series of rumble strips to create music. The driver will hear the tune -- so long as the speed limit is observed. There are only a few of these singing roads in the world. The one in New Mexico will be featured in a new National Geographic Channel series dubbed "Crowd Control" that will make its debut in November.

COMPANY CARD-STRIPPERS

PORTLAND, Maine (AP) -- Here's one for those who worry that the bean counters at your company's accounting department might get on your case about your expense account. A former TD Bank executive has been sentenced to 18 months in prison. The Press Herald of Portland, Maine, reports Jeffrey Burnham used his company credit card to run up a tab of nearly a quarter million dollars at strip clubs. The card was swiped for thousand-dollar bottles of champagne and $750 lap dances -- which Burham said he needed to ease his stress from work.

 
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