Where Does It End? - 08/07/14

Increasing workloads and the ubiquitous presence of technology at work and home are combining to put more pressure on employees to remain always available, according to a recent survey from Randstad U.S. Many workers feel that they have to remain accountable when they're on vacation or sick at home. In fact, a notable share reported that they don't even use all of their available days off because they'd feel too guilty about shirking responsibilities if they did. Given this situation, managers should pay attention to research that indicates workers are less engaged on the job and morale is on the decline in the workplace. As a result, many workers expect to seriously consider offers from new employers in the near future. "Helping employees balance work and personal life remains a pain point for many U.S. companies," says Jim Link, chief human resources officer at Randstad North America. "With technology blurring workday boundaries, employees can easily slip into a pattern of being 'always available,' especially if their boss or co-workers engage in business after hours." More than 2,255 U.S. professionals took part in the research. - See more at: http://www.baselinemag.com/careers/slideshows/workplace-demands-increase-and-morale-sinks.html#sthash.siGuATYu.dpuf

  I don't think it matters what you do for a living, increasingly companies expect you to do more with less.  It's certainly true in the ever-changing broadcast news business.  There are more newscasts, more platforms to share information and the same or fewer people to deliver that product.  It's just the reality of the business.  Broadcasters aren't disappearing like our colleagues in the newspaper business but it's hard not to feel the pressure.

  I recently read a study conducted by Randstad, the temporary staffing company, found 65-percent of professionals feel pressure to answer emails from work during their off time.  I believe it but I don't subscribe to that school of thought. 

  My employer provides me a smart phone.  I'm grateful and it's a useful tool.  I do not, however, spend my off time tethered to the phone.  I keep it with me.  If I need to shoot a picture, record some video of something we might use on the air or need to learn about something on-line right now, I have it.  While I do my best to keep up with what's going on when I'm off work because I'm curious by nature, I'm not constantly checking my email.

  I think being a present spouse, parent, son, neighbor and friend are important.  If you want to talk to me right now, don't send me an email, pick up the phone and call me.  That's why they call it time off.  That's my opinion for what it's worth.  If you disagree, feel free to drop me an email.  I'll get to it when I'm on the clock.


 

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Last Update on July 31, 2015 09:31 GMT

GRANDMOTHER-GETAWAY DRIVER

ROCKAWAY, N.J. (AP) -- It's not exactly quality time with grandma. Police in northern New Jersey report busting a grandmother they say was the getaway driver for her grandson and his friends. According to authorities, a tip after a home rip-off led them to stop the car driven by 78-year-old Vera Buniak. She's been charged with possession of stolen property. Her grandson, 18-year-old Timothy Buniak, faces burglary and other charges. Police tell the Daily Record she may not have known a crime was being committed, but she was part of the process.

MEDICAL MARIJUANA-PRICES

ST. PAUL, Minn. (AP) -- Medicinal marijuana users in Minnesota are in for some sticker shock. One of the state's legal pot producers is raising prices after less than a month in business. Dr. Kyle Kingsley of Minnesota Medical Solutions tells the AP prices on pills, vapors and liquids are up by as much as 20 percent. The company is also reducing the discount for low-income users. Kingsley says low demand is one factor in driving up their pot prices.

TAXIDERMY RIVALRY

LANSING, Mich. (AP) -- It's Michigan State versus the University of Michigan -- as played by stuffed chipmunks. Lansing-based taxidermist Nick Saade has created a football display with 22 stuffed chipmunks wearing little Spartan or Wolverine helmets. The chipmunks are in passing, throwing, catching and tackling positions. Saade tells the Lansing State Journal the chipmunk Spartans are about to score the winning touchdown. He adds, "everybody knows MSU is better -- even the chipmunks."

HOT WORK

MEMPHIS, Tenn. (AP) -- Think you're hot? Don't trade places with Robert Carpenter. He's the pit master at The Grille, a Memphis restaurant. His day starts at 6 when it's relatively cool. But he can't stop grilling as the day heats up. Every time he opens the outdoor barbecue pit, the temperature spikes. Carpenter says a wet towel and an industrial fan help a bit. But he tells the Commercial Appeal newspaper, the real key is, "Water, water and more water."

 
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