Where Does It End? - 08/07/14

Increasing workloads and the ubiquitous presence of technology at work and home are combining to put more pressure on employees to remain always available, according to a recent survey from Randstad U.S. Many workers feel that they have to remain accountable when they're on vacation or sick at home. In fact, a notable share reported that they don't even use all of their available days off because they'd feel too guilty about shirking responsibilities if they did. Given this situation, managers should pay attention to research that indicates workers are less engaged on the job and morale is on the decline in the workplace. As a result, many workers expect to seriously consider offers from new employers in the near future. "Helping employees balance work and personal life remains a pain point for many U.S. companies," says Jim Link, chief human resources officer at Randstad North America. "With technology blurring workday boundaries, employees can easily slip into a pattern of being 'always available,' especially if their boss or co-workers engage in business after hours." More than 2,255 U.S. professionals took part in the research. - See more at: http://www.baselinemag.com/careers/slideshows/workplace-demands-increase-and-morale-sinks.html#sthash.siGuATYu.dpuf

  I don't think it matters what you do for a living, increasingly companies expect you to do more with less.  It's certainly true in the ever-changing broadcast news business.  There are more newscasts, more platforms to share information and the same or fewer people to deliver that product.  It's just the reality of the business.  Broadcasters aren't disappearing like our colleagues in the newspaper business but it's hard not to feel the pressure.

  I recently read a study conducted by Randstad, the temporary staffing company, found 65-percent of professionals feel pressure to answer emails from work during their off time.  I believe it but I don't subscribe to that school of thought. 

  My employer provides me a smart phone.  I'm grateful and it's a useful tool.  I do not, however, spend my off time tethered to the phone.  I keep it with me.  If I need to shoot a picture, record some video of something we might use on the air or need to learn about something on-line right now, I have it.  While I do my best to keep up with what's going on when I'm off work because I'm curious by nature, I'm not constantly checking my email.

  I think being a present spouse, parent, son, neighbor and friend are important.  If you want to talk to me right now, don't send me an email, pick up the phone and call me.  That's why they call it time off.  That's my opinion for what it's worth.  If you disagree, feel free to drop me an email.  I'll get to it when I'm on the clock.


 

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Last Update on August 31, 2015 09:29 GMT

SELFIE CRASH

ORIENT, Maine (AP) -- Texting and driving? Not safe. Driving while taking a selfie? Even more not safe. Police in Maine say a man crashed his car while taking a selfie with his passengers. Authorities say several people were hurt when 29-year-old Jordan Toner lost control of the vehicle he was driving with seven passengers. When he leaned over to take the selfie, his car ran off the road and hit a tree. He's been hit with a distracted driving summons.

DESTINY'S CHALLENGE

BOISE, Idaho (AP) -- Sheriff's deputies in Idaho are trying to find their destiny. That's Destiny as in the girl's name -- not their reason for being. Authorities have been interviewing more than a dozen girls named Destiny as they try to crack a vandalism case. It seems someone spray-painted a prom invitation on part of the Black Cliffs in southwest Idaho back in May. The message read: "Destiny, Prom?" If authorities can track down who was trying to woo Destiny, that person's destiny could be jail. The crime is punishable by up to six months behind bars and a fine of $1,000.

GRENADE BROUGHT TO POLICE STATION

SOUTH BURLINGTON, Vt. (AP) -- A grenade in hand -- was worth a lot of concern to police in South Burlington, Vermont. A woman found a hand grenade in her grandfather's belongings -- and decided to bring it to the police station. That got their attention. Police cleared the department and nearby buildings -- because they weren't sure if the grenade was live. In the end, the state bomb squad had to come in to deal with the grenade. As late as yesterday, authorities hadn't determined whether the grenade was dangerous or inactive. They are urging residents who find grenades or other potentially devices to leave them where they are -- and call the police.

TELESCOPE MISTAKEN FOR RIFLE

FARGO, N.D. (AP) -- They were hoping to check out some stars. But the first light they saw when trying to use their telescope -- was that from police officers who mistook their telescope for a rifle. Levi Joraanstad and Colin Waldera were setting up their telescope behind their apartment Monday when police flashed a bright light into their eyes and told them to freeze. The students couldn't see who was shining the light -- and thought it was a prank by other students. Despite the confusion, it turned out O.K. Police say the students were never in any danger -- and that police approached them because they'd rather be safe than sorry.

 
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