Where Does It End? - 08/07/14

Increasing workloads and the ubiquitous presence of technology at work and home are combining to put more pressure on employees to remain always available, according to a recent survey from Randstad U.S. Many workers feel that they have to remain accountable when they're on vacation or sick at home. In fact, a notable share reported that they don't even use all of their available days off because they'd feel too guilty about shirking responsibilities if they did. Given this situation, managers should pay attention to research that indicates workers are less engaged on the job and morale is on the decline in the workplace. As a result, many workers expect to seriously consider offers from new employers in the near future. "Helping employees balance work and personal life remains a pain point for many U.S. companies," says Jim Link, chief human resources officer at Randstad North America. "With technology blurring workday boundaries, employees can easily slip into a pattern of being 'always available,' especially if their boss or co-workers engage in business after hours." More than 2,255 U.S. professionals took part in the research. - See more at: http://www.baselinemag.com/careers/slideshows/workplace-demands-increase-and-morale-sinks.html#sthash.siGuATYu.dpuf

  I don't think it matters what you do for a living, increasingly companies expect you to do more with less.  It's certainly true in the ever-changing broadcast news business.  There are more newscasts, more platforms to share information and the same or fewer people to deliver that product.  It's just the reality of the business.  Broadcasters aren't disappearing like our colleagues in the newspaper business but it's hard not to feel the pressure.

  I recently read a study conducted by Randstad, the temporary staffing company, found 65-percent of professionals feel pressure to answer emails from work during their off time.  I believe it but I don't subscribe to that school of thought. 

  My employer provides me a smart phone.  I'm grateful and it's a useful tool.  I do not, however, spend my off time tethered to the phone.  I keep it with me.  If I need to shoot a picture, record some video of something we might use on the air or need to learn about something on-line right now, I have it.  While I do my best to keep up with what's going on when I'm off work because I'm curious by nature, I'm not constantly checking my email.

  I think being a present spouse, parent, son, neighbor and friend are important.  If you want to talk to me right now, don't send me an email, pick up the phone and call me.  That's why they call it time off.  That's my opinion for what it's worth.  If you disagree, feel free to drop me an email.  I'll get to it when I'm on the clock.


Get This

Last Update on October 02, 2015 08:05 GMT


PORTLAND, Maine (AP) -- And they called it puppy love -- and with good reason, too. A New England man has fallen paws over paws in love with a shelter dog he saw on the Internet. And he didn't let a lack of money hold him back. Joel Carpenter of Portland, Maine flew to Minneapolis to adopt the puppy. Only problem: he only had money for a one-way trip. But he and his newly adopted pooch are making their way back home, thanks to the Internet and the kindness of strangers. Carpenter says he has been hitching rides, sleeping on couches and posting on Craigslist for help getting back home.


DENVER (AP) -- They were supposed to be a wedding favor designed to produce a smile. Instead they produced an evacuation at Denver International Airport. The TSA says an agent watching checked bags spotted wax and fuses in one of the bags last month. TSA says the bride and groom's names both start with a T -- so the wedding souvenirs were labeled TNT. The area was cleared while bomb specialists checked things out. Turns out that while the bottles were suggested they had TNT, they actually contained bath salts.


PARIS (AP) -- Customs agents at Charles de Gaulle airport in Paris had a hairy situation to deal with. They seized 115 live scorpions. The creepy crawlers were hidden in two shipments from Cameroon to the U.S. Customs officials say the scorpions were declared as samples for medical research. But the intended recipient is identified as an individual in the U.S. who sells a number of "new animal companions" on the Internet.


BRADENTON, Fla. (AP) -- In Bradenton, Florida these days, the big buzz is about a big batch of bees. A beekeeper removed about 50,000 bees from a tree on the town's Main Street. They will be relocated to help with pollination efforts in other areas of the country. The Bradenton Herald reports the bee expert began removing the bees yesterday from a hive just outside an Irish pub. It's unclear where the bees will be shipped. The beekeeper says in the past, he has sent groups of honey bees to Maine, California and other states.

Advertise with us!