Where Does It End? - 08/07/14

Increasing workloads and the ubiquitous presence of technology at work and home are combining to put more pressure on employees to remain always available, according to a recent survey from Randstad U.S. Many workers feel that they have to remain accountable when they're on vacation or sick at home. In fact, a notable share reported that they don't even use all of their available days off because they'd feel too guilty about shirking responsibilities if they did. Given this situation, managers should pay attention to research that indicates workers are less engaged on the job and morale is on the decline in the workplace. As a result, many workers expect to seriously consider offers from new employers in the near future. "Helping employees balance work and personal life remains a pain point for many U.S. companies," says Jim Link, chief human resources officer at Randstad North America. "With technology blurring workday boundaries, employees can easily slip into a pattern of being 'always available,' especially if their boss or co-workers engage in business after hours." More than 2,255 U.S. professionals took part in the research. - See more at: http://www.baselinemag.com/careers/slideshows/workplace-demands-increase-and-morale-sinks.html#sthash.siGuATYu.dpuf

  I don't think it matters what you do for a living, increasingly companies expect you to do more with less.  It's certainly true in the ever-changing broadcast news business.  There are more newscasts, more platforms to share information and the same or fewer people to deliver that product.  It's just the reality of the business.  Broadcasters aren't disappearing like our colleagues in the newspaper business but it's hard not to feel the pressure.

  I recently read a study conducted by Randstad, the temporary staffing company, found 65-percent of professionals feel pressure to answer emails from work during their off time.  I believe it but I don't subscribe to that school of thought. 

  My employer provides me a smart phone.  I'm grateful and it's a useful tool.  I do not, however, spend my off time tethered to the phone.  I keep it with me.  If I need to shoot a picture, record some video of something we might use on the air or need to learn about something on-line right now, I have it.  While I do my best to keep up with what's going on when I'm off work because I'm curious by nature, I'm not constantly checking my email.

  I think being a present spouse, parent, son, neighbor and friend are important.  If you want to talk to me right now, don't send me an email, pick up the phone and call me.  That's why they call it time off.  That's my opinion for what it's worth.  If you disagree, feel free to drop me an email.  I'll get to it when I'm on the clock.


 

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Last Update on May 27, 2015 09:08 GMT

DELOREAN REPLICA

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TRUMP-BED AND BREAKFAST

CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. (AP) -- You can now stay at Donald Trump's place. A bed-and-breakfast is open on Trump Organization property in Charlottesville, Virginia. The B-and-B is in a converted mansion next to the Trump Winery. The Daily Progress reports 10 rooms are available for booking, starting at $349 per night.

 
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