A Teachable Moment - 06/06/13

   Saving You Money isn't just a segment I do on TV.  It's really the way my family lives.  I remember as a little girl my parents saying, "Why pay full price if you don't have to?"  The truth is, you don't!  It's so much fun to score a deal, to wait for the mark downs, to strategize the sales. A few years ago when I started Stacy's Saving You Money segment, I interviewed some expert coupon mamas.  They taught me everything I needed to know about coupon stacking, BOGO deals and sales cycles.  I'll admit, I've fallen off the coupon wagon for a few weeks at a time here and there.  After all, it's hard to work full time, raise two kids, be a wife, manage a home, do community service, take care of pets, garden, exercise, volunteer at school/church and find the time for all that scissor cutting and filing.  For the most part though, we stick with the strategy.
    This brings me to the teachable moment.  The other night, we were going to go out to eat.  This isn't something we do all that often.  Before we left, my husband said, "Where's the Clipper magazine or the ValuPak or the coupon binder?"  He wanted to see which coupons we had for which restaurants BEFORE we made a decision about where we were going to eat.  My daughter wanted to go to Five Guys (which we love Five Guys,) however we did not have a coupon for Five Guys on this particular night.  We did have a coupon for Culver's, another burger joint that was offering a BOGO on burgers and a BOGO on icecream.  We'd basically pay half.  My daughter made her case at which point we countered with the coupon argument.  Then she says, "Why do we always have to have a coupon?"  My husband and I both rushed to answer, "Because money doesn't grow on trees."  "Because we want you to understand the value of a dollar."  "Because if we spend less tonight, we'll have more for later."  "Because we're the parents, we make the rules."  And finally the question she couldn't answer and the one that hushed her.... "Why pay full price if you don't have to?"
   Now I realize we may be old fashioned.  We make our children fold towels and empty the dishwasher.  They also help water the plants and take care of the pets (sort of.) In return, they earn $2 a week.  Through this process, they have learned how precious those dollars are and how they can really add up.  Yes, they get paid for their work, but they really get paid with the satisfaction of a job well done and the tangible contribution they make day in and day out. It would be a lot easier and less confrontational to do everything for them and to let them choose the restaurant regardless of coupons, but we would be doing them a disservice.  This way, when they're ready to spread their wings and leave our cheap nest, they'll have real strategies that will last a life time and hopefully they'll never pay full price when they don't have to. 

 

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Last Update on October 24, 2014 09:09 GMT

COIN TOSS-MAYOR

LIMA, Peru (AP) -- Usually, one flips a coin to determine things like who gets the ball first in a football game or who gets first dibs at the last slice of pie or something. But to settle an election? That's what happened in a small town high in the Peruvian Andes. Two candidates tied at the ballot box -- with each getting 236 votes in the municipal election. Peru's electoral law allows tie races to be decided by a coin toss. So the coin was tossed. And the winner -- Wilber Medina. His rival says he's cool with the results. It isn't known whether heads or tails carried the day -- and the election.

PUMPKINS-PIGS

SOMERSWORTH, N.H. (AP) -- It started as a potential case of pilfered pumpkins. But it turned out to be a windfall for a group of pigs. Foster's Daily Democrat in Somersworth, New Hampshire reports hundreds of pumpkins were reported stolen earlier week. The gourds had been set aside behind a school to be sold this weekend at a craft fair. The investigation didn't get far. Turns out a farmer spotted the pumpkins and asked a school worker if he could take them to feed his pigs. The school employee didn't know the pumpkins were being saved -- and the farmer took them. Police say the only ones that turned out happy in the whole episode -- are the hogs.

FIREWORKS-FUNERAL

SPRINGFIELD, Mo. (AP) -- When the fireworks burst in the air tomorrow night over Springfield, Missouri -- it won't be the Fourth of July -- but the last of James Carver. A Missouri funeral director will be bidding farewell to his dad -- by having his cremated remains mixed with fireworks -- and launched into the sky. Carver's father is the first to try the program by Greenlawn Funeral Homes. His son Jim is the funeral director -- and says the eight-minute fireworks display will be followed by a cookout and memorial celebration.

 
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