Black And White - 07/11/14

Black And White

  Nashville and the nation lost a great man today.  A man whose life stood for something--- promoting equality, exposing the Ku Klux Klan, putting himself in harm's way in the name of equality and justice.
  That's the John Lawrence Seigenthaler, Jr  we all know and love.  The man who started out as a lowly reporter at The Tennessean, who blazed trails during the Civil Rights movement publishing stories that made many uncomfortable because it was the right thing to do.   He took down corrupt judges, corrupt Teamsters, racist leaders.  He even got hit over the head with a lead pipe protecting students during a race riot.  He also risked his own life to save a suicidal man from jumping off a bridge.      To him, there was no gray area.  It was black and white, it was right or wrong.  There was no in between.   Seigenthaler was a man of conviction.
    Thank you John Lawrence Seigenthaler for what you stood for, for helping those who couldn't help themselves, for taking the hard road for no other reason ... than just because it was the right thing to do. 
    Anytime you stand up for the right thing, at the right time for ALL the right reasons... regardless of the consequences--- goodness will sprout from that.  And boy did it ever for Mr. Seigenthaler.  He went on to become the Publisher and Editor of not only The Tennessean, but also the founding editor of USA Today. 
   He also founded The First Amendment Center, has the Seigenthaler Center named after him at Vanderbilt  and you've probably been over the bridge downtown that's also named after him.  All of this... before this iconic man ever left this Earth.  He was a living legacy then and forever will be.

 

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Last Update on March 27, 2015 07:06 GMT

DRUNKEN BANK ROBBER

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (AP) -- If you're planning to knock over a bank, it's probably best not to knock down a few first. That's what a man in Tallahassee has found out the hard way. Authorities say an intoxicated Stanley Geddie walked into the Capital City Bank and demanded $100,000 from a manager -- claiming he had a handgun and plastic explosives. When police arrived, they found the man "very intoxicated and spaced out" in the manager's office. They also found a cab driver who said he brought Geddie to the bank -- and complained he got stiffed on his $25.50 fare. At least the would-be robber decided not to drive to the bank heist. The Tallahassee Democrat reports Geddie is charged with robbery, petty theft and resisting an officer. He's also being held on two probation violations.

BASEBALL GIVEAWAY

UNDATED (AP) -- Spring training -- a time for baseball teams and their fans to be optimistic. But the Houston Astros are balking over a planned promotion by one of its minor league affiliates. The Fresno Grizzlies of the Triple-A Pacific Coast League feel so confident the 'Stros will win a title soon, they planned to hand out replica 2017 World Series rings as a promotional giveaway this summer. But once the big league club heard about the pitch, they asked the Triple-A team to bench it. Grizzlies officials say they don't want any issues with its parent club.

POLICE HORSE ON THE LAM

CLEVELAND (AP) -- You've heard about the occasional rogue police officer. But a rogue police horse? A spokesman for the Cleveland police department says a horse with the department's mounted unit was tied up at a cemetery -- but got loose and started roaming the downtown area. Police finally caught up with Jack and got him back where he belonged. Police say there were no reports of injuries or property damage. Officers say Jack stayed on the street during his escape -- but didn't stop at red lights.

GOATS CAPTURED

SEATTLE (AP) -- You've probably heard the phrase: "getting someone's goat." In this case, police in Seattle got someone's goat -- times 10. A herd of 10 goats got free from a yard in the Beacon Hill neighborhood -- and began chasing a group of children. That led police on a chase of their own -- after the creatures. The police website says officers were able to wrangle the goats into a pen. Animal control officers were called to reach the goats' owner.

 
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