Commercialization of Easter & Every Other Holiday - 03/25/14

   Here we are, knocking on Easter's door.  Yet, we've been seeing signs of the big bunny since Christmas.  My daughter asked that very poignant question around Christmastime, "Mom, why do stores put the holiday BEFORE the holiday?"  She was referring to Easter eggs and Peeps displayed just after Christmas along with the trappings of St. Patrick's Day & Valentines too.
   My short answer?  "Sweetie, they want your money." 
   It really does lead to holiday confusion. I feel sometimes when I walk in a store like I'm in some sort of time warp.
    It really is sad that we now have Halloween, Thanksgiving and Christmas in late August. Valentines Day in November,  Easter in December, July 4th in April and the list of holiday creep goes on and on.
   Retailers claim they're giving us what we want.  More time to shop and prepare.  I'm sorry.  I don't want to see St. Nick alongside the beach pales and slip 'n' slides.  I want to enjoy the moment... this very moment.... this season, not three seasons away. 
    I feel like most days I'm on a hamster wheel anyway as most moms do.  Do we really need our stores to speed life up for us even more? 
     The only way to make this blurred seasonal slide subside is to stop buying.  I  personally have stopped.  I don't buy for the holiday until a week or two before (with the exception of Christmas.)   I'll tell  you how I came to this conclusion.  I read where Americans spend nearly $2.1 billion on Easter candy.  I personally would buy Easter candy early.  I would put it in the secret spot.  However, hubby and I always knew it was there.  So, guess what happened?  We'd chip away at it here and there until finally, I had to go back to the store to buy a second round of Easter candy.  Retailers know this about us.  That's why they put it out early.  This goes for Halloween, Valentines, Christmas... really all of the holidays.  All of this early marketing is aimed at us women.  They know we'll buy early and either eat it or forget we bought it and buy double or buy more than we should have.  Brilliant.  They think they have us figured out, but I'm not buying it.  I hope you won't either.
 

 

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Last Update on March 31, 2015 09:08 GMT

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