Crazy Race - 08/11/14

  Four days after the primary election... and one race is still too close to call.  All eyes are on the DesJarlais - Tracy race for U.S. Congress.   Even so, both candidates are declaring victory.  No one is conceding.

   Boy has this been an interesting one.... especially with the scandal that continues to cast a shadow on Dr. DesJarlais.     He's the doctor who admitted in court transcripts to having no less than 8 affairs and using a gun to scare his first wife.  The pro life candidate also admitted under oath to asking one of his many lovers to get an abortion when she became pregnant with his child.   The Tennessee Board of Medical Examiners reprimanded the doctor for  having sex with patients.  It's against state rules for a licensed doctor to do this.

    Right now, there are just 35 votes separating State Sen. Jim Tracy and Dr. DesJarlais and so the physician turned congressman has lawyered up to defend his lead.  He says he's prepping in the event Tracy challenges the race. 

   This is a process that could drag on for weeks.  Right now provisional votes are being counted and this could sway that 35 vote difference. 

    So many political pundits were sure there was no way DesJarlais could weather his self-made scandal and emerge to serve another term. 

   The take away?  Every vote counts, regardless of which candidate you support.  If you didn't want Jim Tracy to win, then you're probably happy with the unofficial 35 vote lead.  But, if you did want him to win and had any concerns about DesJarlais' character and his ability to serve you in Congress----- did you go to the polls and do your part?  If not, why not?  You could be one of the 35 who potentially threw this race.  We're talking less than three dozen.  

    See this earlier blog on our civic duty to VOTE.  It's a privilege thousands of others would love to have.



 

 

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Last Update on October 24, 2014 09:09 GMT

COIN TOSS-MAYOR

LIMA, Peru (AP) -- Usually, one flips a coin to determine things like who gets the ball first in a football game or who gets first dibs at the last slice of pie or something. But to settle an election? That's what happened in a small town high in the Peruvian Andes. Two candidates tied at the ballot box -- with each getting 236 votes in the municipal election. Peru's electoral law allows tie races to be decided by a coin toss. So the coin was tossed. And the winner -- Wilber Medina. His rival says he's cool with the results. It isn't known whether heads or tails carried the day -- and the election.

PUMPKINS-PIGS

SOMERSWORTH, N.H. (AP) -- It started as a potential case of pilfered pumpkins. But it turned out to be a windfall for a group of pigs. Foster's Daily Democrat in Somersworth, New Hampshire reports hundreds of pumpkins were reported stolen earlier week. The gourds had been set aside behind a school to be sold this weekend at a craft fair. The investigation didn't get far. Turns out a farmer spotted the pumpkins and asked a school worker if he could take them to feed his pigs. The school employee didn't know the pumpkins were being saved -- and the farmer took them. Police say the only ones that turned out happy in the whole episode -- are the hogs.

FIREWORKS-FUNERAL

SPRINGFIELD, Mo. (AP) -- When the fireworks burst in the air tomorrow night over Springfield, Missouri -- it won't be the Fourth of July -- but the last of James Carver. A Missouri funeral director will be bidding farewell to his dad -- by having his cremated remains mixed with fireworks -- and launched into the sky. Carver's father is the first to try the program by Greenlawn Funeral Homes. His son Jim is the funeral director -- and says the eight-minute fireworks display will be followed by a cookout and memorial celebration.

 
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