How Does Your Garden Grow? - 06/12/14

Mary Mary Quite Contrary

How Does Your Garden Grow?

I used to love that English nursery rhyme, and since you ask--- well, mine is growing just fine.  The weather has played a huge role this year since we're 2.10" above average rainfall for the month.  We've got carrots coming up, along with cantaloupe, peppers, lettuce, tomatoes, pumpkin, cucumbers, broccoli, blueberries, basil, cilantro, thyme and rosemary. The watermelon and strawberries fizzled out this year, but you can't win 'em all.

There's something cool about digging in the dirt, helping something flourish and then getting to eat what you grow.  You know exactly what's in it and more importantly, what's not. 

Studies show gardening is a good mood stabilizer.  I'm not real big on studies since one contradicts the other depending on who's funding them.  However, a study out of the Netherlands shows gardening can fight stress. I believe this to be true even without the data. They had two groups of stressed out people either read indoors for 30 minutes or garden outdoors for the same amount of time.  The ones who gardened had lower levels of the stress hormone, cortisol, afterwards. 

Most of us, (if we have a smartphone or are on social media or have a boss or clients who like to email,)  are probably suffering from attention fatigue, where we feel this pressure to always pay attention and be accessible.  That feeling of always having to answer someone or something isn't very healthy.  I've seen gardening described as effortless attention, an escape that in return produces more than just food.

If you aren't gardening, give it a try... get dirty.  If you are, let me know what's in your harvest, besides the good mood and sense of well being that comes free with a little digging.

 

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Last Update on June 02, 2015 09:06 GMT

BUFFETT LUNCH

OMAHA, Neb. (AP) -- Lunch with Warren Buffett has already soared into the seven figures. Bidding on a private meal with the legendary investor topped $1 million yesterday afternoon. The online auction benefits the Glide Foundation, which provides social services to the poor and homeless in San Francisco. The winning bidder will get a chance to hear Buffett's advice on investing, philanthropy and life in general. Last year's lunch with Buffett went for more than 2.1 mil. Bidding on eBay for the Buffett lunch closes Friday evening.

NYC SCHOOLS-CONDOMS

NEW YORK (AP) -- Condoms will be part of the lessons in New York City public high schools. The city Board of Education says teachers will now be allowed to demonstrate condom use in high school health education classes. Parents will be able to opt of the lessons for their kids. New York high school students can get free condoms from their schools' health resource rooms. The Classic newspaper at Townsend Harris High School first reported the policy change.

BURGLARY ARREST-JUNK FOOD

IOWA CITY, Iowa (AP) -- Junk food can be bad for your legal health, too. Iowa City police say they followed a trail of junk food away from a convenience store break-in. The Iowa City Press-Citizen reports officers responded to a burglary call and found someone had used a brick to shatter a glass door. They followed a trail of snack food away from the store and located 20-year-old Francisco Jacob Munoz about 100 yards away. Officers say his shirt was covered in nacho cheese. He now faces a number of charges including third-degree burglary.

MUIR WOODS-TALLEST TREE

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) -- The tallest redwood tree in Muir Woods in California is just a kid. Scientists say the 249-foot-tall coast redwood named Tree 76 is 777 years old. It was once thought that the tree was 1,500 years old. Even at 777, the tree is just a baby compared to the huge old-growth trees farther north. The oldest giant sequoia, a redwood species that grows in the Sierra Nevada, is 3,240 years old. The San Francisco Chronicle reports researchers from Humboldt State University studied tree rings to determine the age of the giant trees.

 
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