How Does Your Garden Grow? - 06/12/14

Mary Mary Quite Contrary

How Does Your Garden Grow?

I used to love that English nursery rhyme, and since you ask--- well, mine is growing just fine.  The weather has played a huge role this year since we're 2.10" above average rainfall for the month.  We've got carrots coming up, along with cantaloupe, peppers, lettuce, tomatoes, pumpkin, cucumbers, broccoli, blueberries, basil, cilantro, thyme and rosemary. The watermelon and strawberries fizzled out this year, but you can't win 'em all.

There's something cool about digging in the dirt, helping something flourish and then getting to eat what you grow.  You know exactly what's in it and more importantly, what's not. 

Studies show gardening is a good mood stabilizer.  I'm not real big on studies since one contradicts the other depending on who's funding them.  However, a study out of the Netherlands shows gardening can fight stress. I believe this to be true even without the data. They had two groups of stressed out people either read indoors for 30 minutes or garden outdoors for the same amount of time.  The ones who gardened had lower levels of the stress hormone, cortisol, afterwards. 

Most of us, (if we have a smartphone or are on social media or have a boss or clients who like to email,)  are probably suffering from attention fatigue, where we feel this pressure to always pay attention and be accessible.  That feeling of always having to answer someone or something isn't very healthy.  I've seen gardening described as effortless attention, an escape that in return produces more than just food.

If you aren't gardening, give it a try... get dirty.  If you are, let me know what's in your harvest, besides the good mood and sense of well being that comes free with a little digging.

 

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Last Update on February 27, 2015 10:09 GMT

ESCALATOR-PANTS

SOMERVILLE, Mass. (AP) -- It's awfully cold in the Boston area to go without pants. Transit officials say a commuter riding the "T" lost his trousers to an escalator. A spokesman for the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority tells the Boston Herald the man's pants got caught in the escalator. The commuter wasn't hurt, but he was left standing in his shorts while his trousers were stuck at the bottom of the escalator. Transit officials are urging commuters to be mindful of loose clothing.

DOG BREEDS-NYC

NEW YORK (AP) -- The Big Apple is giving little Frenchies some love. The French bulldog is now the most popular breed in New York City. The American Kennel Club says the flat-faced, bat-eared little dogs move past the bulldog to the top spot. The AKC says the rest of the top five in NYC are Labrador retrievers, German shepherds and golden retrievers. Nationally, Labs stay number-one for a record 24th year.

COCA-COLA BOTTLE

ATLANTA (AP) -- It's the real thing -- but is it real art? The curvy Coca-Cola bottle is being celebrated by an Atlanta art museum. The High Museum is opening an exhibit tomorrow to mark the 100th anniversary of the iconic Coke bottle. Visitors will be able to see original designs, a prototype of the 1915 bottle and the work of artists who have been inspired by the now-classic bottle. "The Coca-Cola Bottle: An American Icon at 100" runs through October 4.

NEW BABY ORCA

SEATTLE (AP) -- Scientists are seeing the splash of little whale fins. A third baby orca has been spotted off the coast of Washington state. Brad Hanson, a biologist with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, says the baby killer whale looks great and is very active. It's the third baby born to whale pods in recent months in the area. But the experts warn the orca population is still dangerously low.

 
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