Manipulating Father Time - 11/05/13

    It seems at every turn this week, someone is complaining about the time shift.  A friend wrote on Facebook, "Why do we have to do this every year?  Depressing."   At my dental check up Monday, the hygienist brought it up saying she's starting to feel depressed by the darkness at 5:00.  I agreed wholeheartedly. 
    In my line of work, I aim to keep my opinion to myself.  But on this topic, I'm clearly not riding the fence.  Dislike with a capital D!
   This is 2013.  Why are we still manipulating father time?   This is supposed to benefit an agrarian society and as I was reading, has no real benefit for an industrialized society. So again, I ask... why are we still doing this?  I love our farmers, but come on.   Last time I checked, we passed through the Industrial Revolution with flying colors in the early 1800's.
    How about we just stay on summer hours all year long.  You know, there are other countries doing this with great success and less complaining---   Argentina, Iceland, Russia, Uzbekistan and Belarus are all doing it.  I sound like Nike now.. JUST DO IT!!    
    So, who can we thank for all of this time trouble?  George Vernon Hudson.  Yeah, this ole boy came up with the clever concept in 1895.  Germany was first on board as a way to  ease coal shortages during WWI.  The US followed suit in 1918... and so began this scheduled saga.
     I was reading where this practice actually complicates billing, record keeping, even medical devices. People miss meetings over this silliness.   So, there's a real cost value here.  Not the least of which is my sleep.  I haven't gotten a good night's sleep in three days.  Why? Because my kids go to bed at their normal bed time, but they're still waking up at their OLD time.  Their body clock is telling them it's 7:30, when in fact... it's just 6:30!!!! (Way too early for us-- we are NOT MORNING PEOPLE.)  Don't get me wrong.  I love my kids more than anything.  I just don't want to see them quite that early.      Here's to longer days and the hope that someone in government eventually comes to their senses and stops this seasonal charade.

 

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Last Update on July 31, 2015 09:31 GMT

GRANDMOTHER-GETAWAY DRIVER

ROCKAWAY, N.J. (AP) -- It's not exactly quality time with grandma. Police in northern New Jersey report busting a grandmother they say was the getaway driver for her grandson and his friends. According to authorities, a tip after a home rip-off led them to stop the car driven by 78-year-old Vera Buniak. She's been charged with possession of stolen property. Her grandson, 18-year-old Timothy Buniak, faces burglary and other charges. Police tell the Daily Record she may not have known a crime was being committed, but she was part of the process.

MEDICAL MARIJUANA-PRICES

ST. PAUL, Minn. (AP) -- Medicinal marijuana users in Minnesota are in for some sticker shock. One of the state's legal pot producers is raising prices after less than a month in business. Dr. Kyle Kingsley of Minnesota Medical Solutions tells the AP prices on pills, vapors and liquids are up by as much as 20 percent. The company is also reducing the discount for low-income users. Kingsley says low demand is one factor in driving up their pot prices.

TAXIDERMY RIVALRY

LANSING, Mich. (AP) -- It's Michigan State versus the University of Michigan -- as played by stuffed chipmunks. Lansing-based taxidermist Nick Saade has created a football display with 22 stuffed chipmunks wearing little Spartan or Wolverine helmets. The chipmunks are in passing, throwing, catching and tackling positions. Saade tells the Lansing State Journal the chipmunk Spartans are about to score the winning touchdown. He adds, "everybody knows MSU is better -- even the chipmunks."

HOT WORK

MEMPHIS, Tenn. (AP) -- Think you're hot? Don't trade places with Robert Carpenter. He's the pit master at The Grille, a Memphis restaurant. His day starts at 6 when it's relatively cool. But he can't stop grilling as the day heats up. Every time he opens the outdoor barbecue pit, the temperature spikes. Carpenter says a wet towel and an industrial fan help a bit. But he tells the Commercial Appeal newspaper, the real key is, "Water, water and more water."

 
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