Potty Humor - 09/26/13

   So, I had the great joy of spending the day with my son on his field trip.  Furthermore, I got to chaperone six, count 'em, six boys!!!!!!    I could just end this blog right there and let your imaginations run wild. Believe me, there's no shortage of material when six boys get to run wild and free on a farm for four hours during school.

   We visited the Sam Davis Home in Smyrna.  Davis is known as the boy hero of the Confederacy.  His farm provides an amazing hands on experience of life in the mid 1800's.  We got to watch someone churn butter.  We learned how to wash clothes on a washboard.  We even got to help make soap.  We got to pet horses, watched pigs root in the mud, played in a barn, learned how a blacksmith molds hot metal, played with a cannon ball, and got our picture made with Abe Lincoln and Harriet Tubman. Wow, what a day.

    So, what does the title of this blog have to do with any of that?  Everything.  You see, we got to do all of that, but the real fun came when we visited THE OUTHOUSE.  Yay!

    Not just any outhouse, this was a super duper outhouse with three holes.  They were lined up side by side with a big sign that said, "Do Not Sit."  Afterall, that wood was probably rotten... the boys could have fallen in... there would be lawsuits and finger pointing and no more field trips.  So, what did the boys do?  Oh, they 'technically' followed the rules alright.  They, in unison, as if communicating telepathically, turned around, bent over and stuck their heads straight down in those holes.

    I quickly grabbed my Iphone to snap a picture of the wrong end of their bodies staring back at me.  (This will be good blackmail one day when they bring that first girl home to meet Mom.)  The reporter in me wanted to blurt out, "Did you know 40 thousand Americans are injured by toilets every year?"  (That's actually a true stat.)  But, I didn't.  I decided to let the journalist/mom/chaperone in me take a step back and just let boys be boys.

Why? Why would little boys want to stick their heads in what used to be a toilet?  We spent 15 minutes in this outhouse with the six taking turns rotating their sweaty faces from one hole to the next.   Now, mind you I had been on this same field trip two years prior with my daughter.  Do you think they stuck their heads in the latrine?  It never even crossed their minds.

   Curious about this dichotomy, I did a little research.  Psychologists say potty humor is a normal part of childhood development, especially for boys.  Another psychologist says talk of farts and poop brings them great joy.  It helps them develop their personality.

    So, at lunch, I asked, "So guys, what was your favorite thing today?"

   And, I'll end this blog right there.

 

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Last Update on October 24, 2014 09:09 GMT

COIN TOSS-MAYOR

LIMA, Peru (AP) -- Usually, one flips a coin to determine things like who gets the ball first in a football game or who gets first dibs at the last slice of pie or something. But to settle an election? That's what happened in a small town high in the Peruvian Andes. Two candidates tied at the ballot box -- with each getting 236 votes in the municipal election. Peru's electoral law allows tie races to be decided by a coin toss. So the coin was tossed. And the winner -- Wilber Medina. His rival says he's cool with the results. It isn't known whether heads or tails carried the day -- and the election.

PUMPKINS-PIGS

SOMERSWORTH, N.H. (AP) -- It started as a potential case of pilfered pumpkins. But it turned out to be a windfall for a group of pigs. Foster's Daily Democrat in Somersworth, New Hampshire reports hundreds of pumpkins were reported stolen earlier week. The gourds had been set aside behind a school to be sold this weekend at a craft fair. The investigation didn't get far. Turns out a farmer spotted the pumpkins and asked a school worker if he could take them to feed his pigs. The school employee didn't know the pumpkins were being saved -- and the farmer took them. Police say the only ones that turned out happy in the whole episode -- are the hogs.

FIREWORKS-FUNERAL

SPRINGFIELD, Mo. (AP) -- When the fireworks burst in the air tomorrow night over Springfield, Missouri -- it won't be the Fourth of July -- but the last of James Carver. A Missouri funeral director will be bidding farewell to his dad -- by having his cremated remains mixed with fireworks -- and launched into the sky. Carver's father is the first to try the program by Greenlawn Funeral Homes. His son Jim is the funeral director -- and says the eight-minute fireworks display will be followed by a cookout and memorial celebration.

 
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