Snaggletooth - 08/18/14

   We've had a lot of loose teeth this summer and inevitably, they fall out when we have no cash on us and no ability to get any.  Hence, making this tooth fairy charade hard to keep alive.  Especially, when you consider our kids are intuitive, a little older and definitely on to us. 

    As a general rule, we don't usually carry cash anyway, so if a tooth's going to fall out... we need a little advanced planning.  Problem is, these things are unpredictable.   A lost tooth no doubt requires a trip to the ATM and the last two teeth have let go when there's no ATM in sight. 

     Case in point, when my son lost one of his this summer, we were at the lake, out in the boondocks, with no access to an ATM.  Thankfully, we had family there with us and my brother in law had a little cash on him.  He spotted us the money and helped us keep the tooth fairy tale alive for one more round.  

    The other tooth that threw us for a loop was my daughter's which she lost right before bed time one night this summer.  Again, who's going out to an ATM at 10?  Not me.  I have a coworker who got shot getting cash at an ATM at night.  So, here we go scrounging around for nickels and dimes and quarters, digging through our car consoles, the junk drawer, etc. 

   However, that creates another whole issue.  Why did one kid get a nice crispy new $5 bill for his tooth, but the tooth fairy only brought the other child some ones and a lot of coins?   See how hard this charade is to keep up?  I wanted to say, "Because you lose your teeth at the most inopportune times and your parents can't pop an exact monetary denomination out of our ears on cue.....  in the middle of the night or when we're out in the country with no stores."   But that would have ruined it for everybody.  So, I just explained that the tooth fairy makes a lot of stops.  Sometimes, you're first on her route, sometimes you're last.  You get what you get and you don't pitch a fit. :)

   Then comes the question, "Mom, the tooth fairy's writing looks a lot like dad's.  Don't you think I'm getting a little old for this?"   I was so close to saying, "Yes, and so am I.  This tooth fairy charade is giving me grey hair."  But, again... I didn't.   Instead, I said, "I will always believe in the magic of fairies, Santa and the Easter Bunny and I hope you will too."  

    The end.... and now we have a little stash of cash for the next late night tooth to drop.     

 

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Last Update on October 24, 2014 09:09 GMT

COIN TOSS-MAYOR

LIMA, Peru (AP) -- Usually, one flips a coin to determine things like who gets the ball first in a football game or who gets first dibs at the last slice of pie or something. But to settle an election? That's what happened in a small town high in the Peruvian Andes. Two candidates tied at the ballot box -- with each getting 236 votes in the municipal election. Peru's electoral law allows tie races to be decided by a coin toss. So the coin was tossed. And the winner -- Wilber Medina. His rival says he's cool with the results. It isn't known whether heads or tails carried the day -- and the election.

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SOMERSWORTH, N.H. (AP) -- It started as a potential case of pilfered pumpkins. But it turned out to be a windfall for a group of pigs. Foster's Daily Democrat in Somersworth, New Hampshire reports hundreds of pumpkins were reported stolen earlier week. The gourds had been set aside behind a school to be sold this weekend at a craft fair. The investigation didn't get far. Turns out a farmer spotted the pumpkins and asked a school worker if he could take them to feed his pigs. The school employee didn't know the pumpkins were being saved -- and the farmer took them. Police say the only ones that turned out happy in the whole episode -- are the hogs.

FIREWORKS-FUNERAL

SPRINGFIELD, Mo. (AP) -- When the fireworks burst in the air tomorrow night over Springfield, Missouri -- it won't be the Fourth of July -- but the last of James Carver. A Missouri funeral director will be bidding farewell to his dad -- by having his cremated remains mixed with fireworks -- and launched into the sky. Carver's father is the first to try the program by Greenlawn Funeral Homes. His son Jim is the funeral director -- and says the eight-minute fireworks display will be followed by a cookout and memorial celebration.

 
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