Wacky Weather - 04/14/14

  It may be baseball season, but I sure didn't expect this curveball.  If you planted your flowers or vegetables this weekend, you were with the crowd.   Our Home Depot even ran out of pine straw.  The 80 degree days certainly got us all in the mood for a little weed pulling and color infusion. 

  Now, news of temps, that my flowers and yours, won't like!  The National Weather Service even says we have the potential to set a record.   The lowest temp on record for April 16th (tomorrow, also tax day) is 28 degrees.  That was set back in 1988.  Our projected low?  29 degrees.

   If you were out there diggin' in the dirt yesterday... don't beat yourself up.  Every grower's guide I've looked at today says we're safe to start planting after April 6 in the Nashville area.  Heck, I would have started on April 7 if it wasn't still so cold.

   Just out of curiosity, I took a deeper look at the NWS data for April.  Most of the records dealt with tornadoes and high winds.   There were some records set for cold weather, but thank goodness.. these are rare folks. 

   The only record more astonishing than the one we could break this week was a rare freeze and snowfall on April 25, 1910.  This is the latest date on record for measurable snowfall.   Talk about extremes: on April 26, 1989 Music City set a record high at 91 degrees.  The heat I can take... the cold I can't. 

   So, what to do now?  Some horticulturalists recommend bed sheets to cover your new plants.  You can even use burlap or newspaper.   One site suggested cutting the bottoms off milk, juice or soda jugs and placing it over the baby plants.  It acts as a mini greenhouse.   While these are all great ideas,  the practicality at our house is just not there.  The fact is we did some serious planting this weekend.  There's a lot of territory to cover and I just don't think I have enough sheets to go around.  I could get my kids out of bed when I get home and steal their sheets.  They have sleeping bags, but I don't think that would go over so well.  I read my newspapers online so newspaper's not an option.  Our milk and juice cartons are full.  We just went to the store.  And finally, I'll be tired by 11:00pm tonight and probably won't feel like fumbling around in the cold and dark.

    So, here goes nothing.  I'm going to let go of the controls and let nature take its course.  I'm anticipating the most beautiful, bountiful garden ever --- when summer finally gets here.  Who's with me?  








































































x17.com/news/features/top-stories/stories/gas-prices-spike-due-supply-demand-20798.shtml



Prices at the pump have matched their high of last July.The national average for a gallon of regular gasoline has risen for the 20th straight day, according to Triple AAA. They does not expect the trend to stop based on lower supplies and rising demand.A gallon of regular gasoline is averaging 6 cents more than last at $3.64. Tennessee jumped 7 cents, averaging $3.48. A year ago, Tennessee averaged $3.34/gallon.CLICK HERE to check gas prices in your area on the FOX 17 Fuel Gauge.

Read More at: http://fox17.com/news/features/top-stories/stories/gas-prices-spike-due-supply-demand-20798.shtml Prices at the pump have matched their high of last July.The national average for a gallon of regular gasoline has risen for the 20th straight day, according to Triple AAA. They does not expect the trend to stop based on lower supplies and rising demand.A gallon of regular gasoline is averaging 6 cents more than last at $3.64. Tennessee jumped 7 cents, averaging $3.48. A year ago, Tennessee averaged $3.34/gallon.CLICK HERE to check gas prices in your area on the FOX 17 Fuel Gauge.

Read More at: http://fox17.com/news/features/top-stories/stories/gas-prices-spike-due-supply-demand-20798.shtmlRead More at: http://fox17.com/news/features/top-stories/stories/gas-prices-spike-due-supply-demand-20798.shtml

 

Get This

Last Update on March 30, 2015 07:07 GMT

PINK CHICKENS

PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) -- If someone said they saw pink elephants, you'd ask what drinks had gotten into them. When people in Portland, Oregon spotted pink chickens -- it turned out it was because of the drinks the birds had gotten on them. Animal control officials picked up the pink pullets after they were spotted running loose in the city's waterfront park. Turns out the owner used food coloring, beet juice and Kool-Aid to dye the birds. He says he released them for a while to "make people smile." He may not be smiling at the result. He got a bill for the time the chickens were in county care -- and a scolding about the dangers of releasing birds in public areas.

PIANO MOUNTAIN

CALABASAS, Calif. (AP) -- You've heard of Mount Rushmore and Mount Everest -- but Mount Piano? Hikers who made the trek up to Topanga Lookout in the Santa Monica Mountains of California recently have come upon an odd sight: a battered upright piano, sitting on a graffiti-covered concrete slab. Turns out the piano was used for a music video. The video producer says he and four others used a dolly and rope to haul the 350-pound instrument a mile up the trail last week. After the shoot, it was too dark to get it down. The video maker says while it seems people are happy to see it there, he will haul it back down if necessary.

SNACK RUN

PHILADELPHIA (AP) -- We've all had those times: you have a craving for something to eat or drink in the wee hours, and hop out of bed to get it. In this case, the person with the craving in the wee hours was a wee lass: just 4 years old. And to get to the store, she hopped on a Philadelphia bus. Police say the girl slipped on a purple raincoat, slipped out of her house at 3 a.m. in a downpour -- and boarded the bus. Driver Harlan Jenifer says the girl swung her legs in her seat as she chanted, "All I want is a slushie." The driver called police, who took the girl to a hospital where she was reunited with her mom. Authorities say the girl's family was unaware she had gone on her slushie run.

ANGRY BIRDS?

MELBOURNE, Fla. (AP) -- It's a game of angry birds no one in Melbourne, Florida wants to play. Officials say ducks, geese, seagulls and other feathered friends are acting more like feathered fiends -- chasing people and tying up traffic in Wells Park. Animal officials say it appears the birds are losing their fear of people. And in some cases, that means people are gaining a fear of birds. City Manager Mick McNees tells the Florida Today newspaper three white geese chased him as he jogged in the park. He says he had trouble scaring the birds off -- but fears that an older person or child may not be able to. Officials have put up signs barring people from feeding wildlife to try to restore the balance of nature in the park.

 
Advertise with us!