Wacky Weather - 04/14/14

  It may be baseball season, but I sure didn't expect this curveball.  If you planted your flowers or vegetables this weekend, you were with the crowd.   Our Home Depot even ran out of pine straw.  The 80 degree days certainly got us all in the mood for a little weed pulling and color infusion. 

  Now, news of temps, that my flowers and yours, won't like!  The National Weather Service even says we have the potential to set a record.   The lowest temp on record for April 16th (tomorrow, also tax day) is 28 degrees.  That was set back in 1988.  Our projected low?  29 degrees.

   If you were out there diggin' in the dirt yesterday... don't beat yourself up.  Every grower's guide I've looked at today says we're safe to start planting after April 6 in the Nashville area.  Heck, I would have started on April 7 if it wasn't still so cold.

   Just out of curiosity, I took a deeper look at the NWS data for April.  Most of the records dealt with tornadoes and high winds.   There were some records set for cold weather, but thank goodness.. these are rare folks. 

   The only record more astonishing than the one we could break this week was a rare freeze and snowfall on April 25, 1910.  This is the latest date on record for measurable snowfall.   Talk about extremes: on April 26, 1989 Music City set a record high at 91 degrees.  The heat I can take... the cold I can't. 

   So, what to do now?  Some horticulturalists recommend bed sheets to cover your new plants.  You can even use burlap or newspaper.   One site suggested cutting the bottoms off milk, juice or soda jugs and placing it over the baby plants.  It acts as a mini greenhouse.   While these are all great ideas,  the practicality at our house is just not there.  The fact is we did some serious planting this weekend.  There's a lot of territory to cover and I just don't think I have enough sheets to go around.  I could get my kids out of bed when I get home and steal their sheets.  They have sleeping bags, but I don't think that would go over so well.  I read my newspapers online so newspaper's not an option.  Our milk and juice cartons are full.  We just went to the store.  And finally, I'll be tired by 11:00pm tonight and probably won't feel like fumbling around in the cold and dark.

    So, here goes nothing.  I'm going to let go of the controls and let nature take its course.  I'm anticipating the most beautiful, bountiful garden ever --- when summer finally gets here.  Who's with me?  








































































x17.com/news/features/top-stories/stories/gas-prices-spike-due-supply-demand-20798.shtml



Prices at the pump have matched their high of last July.The national average for a gallon of regular gasoline has risen for the 20th straight day, according to Triple AAA. They does not expect the trend to stop based on lower supplies and rising demand.A gallon of regular gasoline is averaging 6 cents more than last at $3.64. Tennessee jumped 7 cents, averaging $3.48. A year ago, Tennessee averaged $3.34/gallon.CLICK HERE to check gas prices in your area on the FOX 17 Fuel Gauge.

Read More at: http://fox17.com/news/features/top-stories/stories/gas-prices-spike-due-supply-demand-20798.shtml Prices at the pump have matched their high of last July.The national average for a gallon of regular gasoline has risen for the 20th straight day, according to Triple AAA. They does not expect the trend to stop based on lower supplies and rising demand.A gallon of regular gasoline is averaging 6 cents more than last at $3.64. Tennessee jumped 7 cents, averaging $3.48. A year ago, Tennessee averaged $3.34/gallon.CLICK HERE to check gas prices in your area on the FOX 17 Fuel Gauge.

Read More at: http://fox17.com/news/features/top-stories/stories/gas-prices-spike-due-supply-demand-20798.shtmlRead More at: http://fox17.com/news/features/top-stories/stories/gas-prices-spike-due-supply-demand-20798.shtml

 

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Last Update on October 24, 2014 09:09 GMT

COIN TOSS-MAYOR

LIMA, Peru (AP) -- Usually, one flips a coin to determine things like who gets the ball first in a football game or who gets first dibs at the last slice of pie or something. But to settle an election? That's what happened in a small town high in the Peruvian Andes. Two candidates tied at the ballot box -- with each getting 236 votes in the municipal election. Peru's electoral law allows tie races to be decided by a coin toss. So the coin was tossed. And the winner -- Wilber Medina. His rival says he's cool with the results. It isn't known whether heads or tails carried the day -- and the election.

PUMPKINS-PIGS

SOMERSWORTH, N.H. (AP) -- It started as a potential case of pilfered pumpkins. But it turned out to be a windfall for a group of pigs. Foster's Daily Democrat in Somersworth, New Hampshire reports hundreds of pumpkins were reported stolen earlier week. The gourds had been set aside behind a school to be sold this weekend at a craft fair. The investigation didn't get far. Turns out a farmer spotted the pumpkins and asked a school worker if he could take them to feed his pigs. The school employee didn't know the pumpkins were being saved -- and the farmer took them. Police say the only ones that turned out happy in the whole episode -- are the hogs.

FIREWORKS-FUNERAL

SPRINGFIELD, Mo. (AP) -- When the fireworks burst in the air tomorrow night over Springfield, Missouri -- it won't be the Fourth of July -- but the last of James Carver. A Missouri funeral director will be bidding farewell to his dad -- by having his cremated remains mixed with fireworks -- and launched into the sky. Carver's father is the first to try the program by Greenlawn Funeral Homes. His son Jim is the funeral director -- and says the eight-minute fireworks display will be followed by a cookout and memorial celebration.

 
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