WORKER BOY - 01/08/14

   Go ahead and say it.  Worker Boy, as a title, sounds a bit offensive right out of the gates.  Let me give it a little context before you start the hate mail. :)

    My kids are coming into the TV station tonight for us to have a family dinner. As I'm waiting on them to arrive, I recall several past family dinners at the station that have left me completely embarrassed and beet red.

     The first was of course, the'worker boy' dinner.  On that particular night, we had finished dinner and my kids and husband walked back to my desk with me.  My son, who was just 3 at the time, saw my co-anchor Scott Couch a couple of desks away.  Being the little friendly guy he is and with his very best limited vocabulary he asks,  "Are you my mama's worker boy?"  Thankfully, Scott has kids so he didn't take offense.  He and I still laugh about that to this day and he's okay with me calling him my worker boy every now and then.   Some days I'll walk into work and ask him, "What's worker boy up to today?"  Always good for a giggle.

      Another fun such dinner took place not too long after that.  My son,still 3 at the time, obviously had not developed his 'filter.'   My boss walks in the break room while we're eating and my son says, "Hi, Mr. Blow Up Man."   Again, beet red, I couldn't believe he had uttered those words.  My boss at the time was quite large.  Thankfully, since my son was so little and didn't enunciate well, I'm hoping my boss didn't decipher exactly what he said. 

    Then there was the time, I got anew boss.  This was the 2nd or 3rd boss within a short period of time.  When I introduced my kids to her, they shook her hand and looked her in the eye... all the things they've been taught.  Then my daughter promptly turns to me and asks with genuine concern, "Mommy, do you like this one?"     

   My family usually comes into dinner at least one night a week.  I treasure this time and don't want to leave you thinking I'm raising heathens.  They actually are good kids,who nowadays, have better grasped what is and is not socially acceptable.

    I'll end with one cute moment.  Before coming here for dinner with me for the first time 5 years ago... my kids had never seen a vending machine, or maybe they'd just never noticed one in passing.  So, of course they wanted to know what it was. We had some change on us and let them each choose a candy bar.  The next week when it was time for them to make their weekly trek into dinner, my daughter said, "Oh, I can't wait togo to that store again." 

 

 

 

 

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Last Update on October 24, 2014 09:09 GMT

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SPRINGFIELD, Mo. (AP) -- When the fireworks burst in the air tomorrow night over Springfield, Missouri -- it won't be the Fourth of July -- but the last of James Carver. A Missouri funeral director will be bidding farewell to his dad -- by having his cremated remains mixed with fireworks -- and launched into the sky. Carver's father is the first to try the program by Greenlawn Funeral Homes. His son Jim is the funeral director -- and says the eight-minute fireworks display will be followed by a cookout and memorial celebration.

 
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