You're Your Best Critic - 11/06/13

   From that title, most of you will think this blog is about self improvement and self analysis.  It's not.  This is just a simple blog about two words that I see misused almost daily. Call it grammar 101. Forgive me, I'm a little bit of a word nazi at times.

   Last week, I got an email from a media PR person.  I had sent her an email thanking her for helping us get some pictures we needed for a news story.  She wrote back and the note ended like this: 

   Your welcome. Thanks for spreading the word.   Certainly, we all make mistakes from time to time.  This one's just real easy to fix though.  Your is a possessive pronoun.  You're means you are.  The latter is a contraction, but you don't even have to know all that gobbilly gook . 

    The easiest way I explain it to my kids is if you're using your, you should be able to replace your with my.  If it doesn't fit, it's the other one.   Here's an example:  Go get your hat.  Go get my hat would also work.  However, if the sentence was:  You're going to get my hat.  My can not replace you're because you're means you are.

    Another quick test is to sound out you are in the sentence.  If you are sounds weird, then use your. Example: Go get you're hat.  Sound out you are... that doesn't fit, switch it to your.  Done.

     I have a dear friend, who's a social media mega star.  He helps famous folk maximize their social media reach. I love his tweets because they're always encouraging, like this one:  "It doesn't do any good to make it to the top of a hill... if your alone."  Oops... 

      I tweeted him back, as you see in the picture, and he promptly tweeted me back titling me his spelling accountability partner.  I guess there are worse things I could be called.  I never was good at math, so I'll take it.... the word girl.

      It's really ironic.  A lot of the denigration of the English language can be blamed on social media.  Because of it, we're communicating more---  but we're shortening words to the point we're forgetting how they're really spelled.  Maybe  we never completely grasped it in the first place.  In that case, we're not getting the real practice in long form that we need to work out the kinks.   This hybrid language even has a name now.  It's called techspeak. 

    Just remember, when you're writing your next text, email or tweet, your friends will be watching how you're spelling you're and yourYou're smart, so choose your words wisely and your sentences will shine no matter what you're writing.

     Now, I need to find me a math accountability partner.  My shortcoming. ;)

    


     

 

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Last Update on August 22, 2014 07:10 GMT

"STONER" ARRESTED FOR POT

ORANGE, Va. (AP) -- It's a twist on the old saying that when dog bites man, it isn't news, but when man bites dog, it is news. A "stoner" being arrested for pot possession isn't news. But when the "stoner" is named "Stoner" -- it's worth taking note of. This "Stoner" -- 42-year-old Paul Scott Stoner -- was arrested in Virginia. And authorities in the commonwealth say he is facing drug charges after police found more than $10,000 worth of pot at his home. He's charged with growing marijuana and having a firearm while in possession of more than a pound of marijuana. Stoner is free on bond, with a hearing set for next week.

PAY IT FORWARD

ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. (AP) -- Think of it as a "pay it forward" campaign -- on caffeine. A woman in Florida went to a Starbucks drive-thru in Florida on Wednesday and on top of the iced tea she ordered, she asked to pay for the caramel macchiato for the stranger in the car behind her. The man in the car behind returned the favor to the driver behind him -- and a chain reaction started that continued for hours. The store crew kept track -- and before it was over, there were 379 customers who were treated to a Starbucks drink then paid it forward -- or backward, if you want to look at literally. The last customer in the chain declined to pay for someone else's coffee, even though a barista explained the concept to her.

HERMIT IS OUT OF THE WOODS

AUGUSTA, Maine (AP) -- If you run into a guy in Maine who seems just a little out of step with the modern world, do not ask: "What, have you been living in the woods for 30 years?" The answer might be yes. Christopher Knight has spent nearly three decades in the woods, away from society. He survived the brutal winters by swiping food from homes and camps. Knight's story is being told in the current issue of GQ magazine. He says he isn't crazy about the society he's being forced to re-enter. He says the world these days is too colorful, lacks aesthetics -- and is crude.

 
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