Weather Alert

Rain and Snow Expected

A quick-moving system will move through tonight and early Thanksgiving morning producing rain and snow showers. Tonight light rain will push through middle Tennessee. As cold air moves in behind the front, changing rain over to light snow. Snow showers will be likely for folks along and north of I-40, with some accumulation in southern Kentucky and the Cumberland Plateau. 1-2 is possible along the Plateau by early Thursday morning. Up to one-half inch is possible in southern Kentucky and Tennessee counties bordering Kentucky. Folks along the I-40 corridor will see flurries with little to no accumulation. Roads will become slick along the Plateau overnight and early Thursday morning. Use caution.

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WZTV - Search Results

The following is an archived video story. The text content of that video story is available below for reference. The original video has been deleted and is no longer available.

Ticks Cause Red Meat Allergy -- Erika Kurre

Stream WZTV Fox 17 Newscasts LIVE starting with Fox 17 This Morning at 4:30am and Fox 17 News at 5:30pm, 9pm & 10 pm.

NASHVILLE, TN - A sudden allergy to red meat.
   
One midstate doctor is diagnosing as many as a patient per week.

There's very little known about the allergy including whether it is permanent and it's traced back to ticks.

The Lone Star Tick is the culprit.

One bite from the tiny insect could have you re-thinking your next meal.

Gayle Bryant found herself at the doctors office with a rash that began on her neck and seemed untreatable.

No medicine seemed to help but a change in her diet did.

TriStar Summit Medical Center Dr. Lee Bryant has seen this before.

After taking a blood sample, Gayle tested positive for galactose a-1, or alpha-gal.
   
It's a sugar carbohydrate found in red meat but doesn't affect humans when eaten because it doesn't enter the blood stream.

That is, until a Lone Star Tick bites.

Dr. Bryant says he saw his first case of it four years ago and the diagnoses are becoming more common.

As many as one patient per week is diagnosed with the issue in his office many not even knowing they had a tick bite.

Those with the condition can still eat seafood or poultry, just not red meat.
   
The issue is so new that doctor's don't know how long it'll last.

However, Dr. Bryant has noticed antibodies in some patients do drop over time so he re-tests his patients for the allergy every six months or so.

This condition is totally preventable by taking precautions against tick bites.

The CDC recommends avoiding tall grass and brush with leaf debris and use tick repellant.